All posts in Microsoft Flow

I am extremely happy to announce that my 17th Pluralsight course is published and this one is on getting start with using Microsoft Flow both from a user perspective, as well as an administrator! This course covers the theory , but most of the course is made of demos!

Microsoft Flow Usage and Administration

With over 130 million monthly active users, Office 365 is the productivity platform of choice for most enterprises in the world. Built within Office 365 is Microsoft Flow, a business process automation tool that allows you to streamline and automate business processes. In this course, Getting Started with Flow Usage and Administration, you will learn foundational knowledge of Microsoft Flow. First, you will learn the basic terms and concepts of Flow. Next, you will discover how to create your own workflows either starting from a template, or from a blank slate. Finally, you will explore how to administer MSFlow and set governance policies around it. When you’re finished with this course, you will have the skills and knowledge of Microsoft Flow needed to automate business processes in your own organization!

You can find the course on Pluralsight at : https://spvlad.com/PS-MSFlow or by clicking the banner below:

Microsoft Flow Usage and Administration


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I was working on a project to automate Office 365 Group creation using Microsoft Flow and a custom system. When trying to convert the title from another system , which could include !@#$%^? and a bunch of other characters, I had to find a way to convert that string, into an URL friendly string with Microsoft Flow,  At the time of writing this blog, there was no regex support in Microsoft Flow, so we need to get a bit more creative!

How to convert string to URL friendly string with Microsoft Flow

One function that we have access to in Microsoft Flow, is the replace function. The Replace function allows you to replace a character by another one, in our case, we need to replace for example a hashtag (#) by nothing! While this is done one character at a time, you can also nest them, so while not pretty, you would have all the info in a single function. In the example below, I strip the Title dynamic property of the Trigger of the following characters: : % # * < > ? / ” @ & = / ; |) \ [ ] ~ { } ^ ! , .   

PS: The widget below has a “copy” button in the toolbar to make sure you copy it all!

I have created a quick Flow over here in a completely different system, just to show you the results! First, let’s create the simple Flow, three easy steps – Trigger – Create a Variable with the Friendly URL (Optional) – Update the Item

How to convert string to URL friendly string with Microsoft Flow

The value of the Variable is the formula we have above and remember to update it with the actual string that you want fixed! If you copy paste it from the blog, it will fix the Title property of the Trigger.

How to convert string to URL friendly string with Microsoft Flow

And here is the result:

How to convert string to URL friendly string with Microsoft Flow

As you see, my previous example did not take out the spaces, if you want a formula that takes out the spaces, you can use the following one!

Here is the result on the second item:

How to convert string to URL friendly string with Microsoft Flow

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