Archive for April, 2013

Hello Everyone, For the past few weeks I was writing a Whitepaper about maximizing SQL 2012 Performance for SharePoint 2013. It’s  been reviewed by 4 great guys , and after being exclusive to SharePoint-Community.net for one week, I release it to the public!

If you want to see the interesting results I got with the modifications suggested in  this WhitePaper, you can read about them on SharePoint-Community.Net

Read the abstract or download the Whitepaper Directly  here!

Abstact
As a SharePoint Consultant I get to see dozens of SharePoint farms every year, and one of the most common complaints I get from clients – is that SharePoint is slow. A lot of people think that SharePoint is slow because the SharePoint servers are lacking resources or, simply, because SharePoint is a slow product. Although resources allocated to the SharePoint servers (e.g. Web Front Ends and App servers) are important, not a lot of people realize that SharePoint performance is directly related to the database, SQL Server. In fact, 94% of SharePoint data is stored in SQL.

In this whitepaper, we will explore many options on how to optimize SQL Server 2012 for SharePoint 2013.  Here is a high level overview of what we intend to explore.
 
Plan before you install
In this section we will review important best practices on how to format your disks, as well as how to plan where databases, logs and your Temp DB will be located.  Furthermore, depending on the purpose of your SharePoint 2013 Farm, we will determine which databases are most important.

How to install SQL Server 2012
In this section we will discuss what changes during installation can impact SQL 2012 Server performance and explain the reasons behind them. For example, did you know SharePoint 2013 uses a different collation than the default SQL one?
 
Post installation changes
In this section we will examine the changes required immediately after you have installed SQL 2012. This will ensure that we have the correct settings from the outset. We will cover everything from Initial DB size to Fill Factor to Instant File Initialization.
 How to keep it performing well for the years to come
Now that you installed SharePoint 2013, Web Applications are starting to be created, content is added. Unfortunately, if you want to keep your SharePoint fast and your users happy, your job is not done. In this section we will make a list of things you need to check and modify, together with a schedule.  Luckily, since we made things right in the Post Installation changes, you won’t have to do them very often.

Leave  a comment and don’t forget to like us on Facebook here and to follow me on Google+ here and on Twitter here  for the latest news and technical articles on SharePoint.  Also, don’t forget to check the SharePoint Community Partners list for other great SharePoint Sites, and vote for my blog if you like my content!

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Every month I do an article about all the resources I found online about SharePoint 2013. These free Resources come from Microsoft directly or from other partners but unfortunately not a lot of people check regularly and sometimes they are well hidden.

I am happy to present you Part 6 of the “Free SharePoint Server 2013 Resources” series that gives you all the resources for the month of March.

Downloads

  1. Download SharePoint 2013 WAN architecture diagrams from Official Microsoft Download Center
  2. Download Traditional Topologies for SharePoint 2013 from Official Microsoft Download Center–NEW VERSION
  3. Download Streamlined topologies for SharePoint Server 2013 from Official Microsoft Download Center
  4. Download Services on server install workseet for streamlined SharePoint Server 2013 topologies from Official Microsoft Download Center
  5. Microsoft Exchange 2013 for SharePoint Administrator WhitePaper
  6. Fixing SharePoint Performance and Availability
  7. Plan service deployment in SharePoint 2013
  8. Internet sites search architectures for SharePoint Server 2013
  9. Enterprise search architectures for SharePoint Server 2013
  10. Search architectures for SharePoint Server 2013
  11. Download What’s new in Project Pro for Office 365, and sync to SharePoint Online from Official Microsoft Download Center
  12. SharePoint Server 2013 Client Components SDK
  13. Download SharePoint 2013 Upgrade Process from Official Microsoft Download Center
  14. Download SharePoint 2013: How to Test Upgrade from Official Microsoft Download Center
  15. Download How to build a social media-sharing site in SharePoint 2013 from Official Microsoft Download Center

Roadmaps

  1. User profiles for SharePoint Sever 2013 learning roadmap

Tools

  1. Download SharePoint Color Palette Tool from Official Microsoft Download Center
  2. SharePoint Code Analysis Framework
  3. CKS Dev for Visual Studio 2012 is now available!

Leave  a comment and don’t forget to like us on Facebook here and to follow me on Google+ here and on Twitter here  for the latest news and technical articles on SharePoint.  Also, don’t forget to check the SharePoint Community Partners list for other great SharePoint Sites, and vote for my blog if you like my content!

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Hey guys, over the past months I have covered the news about the MCSD SharePoint 2013 exam. It was all myths until earlier this month when Microsoft finally reveled information about the 71-488, and 71-489. I thought my coverage was over.. but no!

As I said in my last post, the Beta exams are open.. well I got good news for you!  For a LIMITED time and LIMITED quantity, Microsoft is giving the Beta exams for free!

Thanks to Tom Resing for telling them on twitter!

You can now sign up with prometric for exam 71-488 using code MCSD488J 

And for exam 71-489 using code MCSD489J.

They work as of Sunday, 14 April 2013, 6:58 PM. They are Limited Quantity, so I don’t know when they will stop working.. so Be fast!
EDIT(19/04/2013) Looks like all the codes have been used! If you didn’t catch one, make sure you follow me on twitter/FB/Google+ so next time there is something, you will be the first to know!
I will keep posting about those deals because people seem to love them. If you want to make sure you are the first to hear about them, follow me on twitter or like the Facebook page! If the code worked, don’t hesitate to say thanks! 

Leave  a comment and don’t forget to like us on Facebook here and to follow me on Google+ here and on Twitter here  for the latest news and technical articles on SharePoint.  Also, don’t forget to check the SharePoint Community Partners list for other great SharePoint Sites, and vote for my blog if you like my content!

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Microsoft released today an Important Security Update for SharePoint 2013. However, be careful with the details!

Executive Summary

This security update resolves a publicly disclosed vulnerability in Microsoft SharePoint Server. The vulnerability could allow information disclosure if an attacker determined the address or location of a specific SharePoint list and gained access to the SharePoint site where the list is maintained. The attacker would need to be able to satisfy the SharePoint site’s authentication requests to exploit this vulnerability.

This security update is rated Important for all supported editions of Microsoft SharePoint Server 2013. For more information, see the subsection, Affected and Non-Affected Software, in this section.

However:

Known issue with this security update

  • This security update requires prior installation of the SharePoint and Project Server 2013 cumulative update package that was released on the Microsoft Download Center on March 12, 2013, and on Microsoft Update on April 9, 2013. This package contains the cumulative updates for both the SharePoint and Project 2013 applications, and it is available from the Microsoft Download Center and from Microsoft Update. 

So before you try to install this security patch, make you you install the SharePoint Server 2013 March Cumulative Update! 
I guess when Microsoft released the March 2013 CU, they were serious when they said :

Due to a change in the package configuration introduced after SharePoint 2013 RTM the March Public update is a mandatory requirement in order to install subsequent SharePoint Updates

So, patch your SharePoint 2013’s to the latest CU and install this security pack. But be careful if you do it in production, as the March CU might take hours to complete, and this security patch might require a reboot!
By the way, the Great SharePoint Survey by SharePoint-Community.net is now open and we would love to hear what you think about the new features in SharePoint 2013! Furthermore, three random persons that filled the survey will win a free O’Reilly e-book of your choice!   Check out the Great SharePoint Survey 2013 here. 

Leave  a comment and don’t forget to like us on Facebook here and to follow me on Google+ here and on Twitter here  for the latest news and technical articles on SharePoint.  Also, don’t forget to check the SharePoint Community Partners list for other great SharePoint Sites, and vote for my blog if you like my content!

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After Microsoft released information about the 70-489 exam last week, they finally released the information about the second SharePoint 2013 exam 70-489. Furthermore, towards the end of the post I found some information that suggests you can already take the Beta exams! Here we go:

Official Exam Name


70-488 Developing Microsoft SharePoint Server 2013 Core Solutions


Date Exam will (should) be available

June 20, 2013

Technology 

This is really interesting. Similar to the 70-489, on the Site, the exam is supposed to be for Visual Studio 2010. I was really expecting it to be with Visual Studio 2012.

Audience Profile

Candidates for this exam typically are technical leads with at least four years of SharePoint and web development experience. The candidates are responsible for designing custom code for projects that are deployed to or interact with SharePoint environments.

The minimally qualified candidate typically has experience:

  • selecting an appropriate approach and building customizations in SharePoint.

  • planning and implementing solution packaging, deployment, and upgrading.

  • identifying SharePoint data and content structures for customizations.

  • performing diagnostics and debugging.

  • planning and designing applications for scalability and performance.

  • identifying and mitigating performance issues of customizations.

  • understanding authentication and authorization.

  • working with Windows PowerShell.  

The typical candidate usually also has familiarity with SharePoint capabilities and with Online Services such as Windows Azure and SharePoint Online as well as developing Office client apps.

The audience Profile is 99% the same as the 70-489, however there is that last few words at the end that make all the difference “as well as developing Office client apps


Skills Measured

Plan and Design SharePoint Sites (10-15 percent)

  • Manage the site life cycle.

    • This objective may include but is not limited to: create a delayed site collection, manage site collection disposition, identify inactive site collections, back up and archive site collection data

  • Create content types.

    • This objective may include but is not limited to: subscribe to published content types, choose appropriate content type creation, use Schema Development, create content types using Object Model, create site columns, use content type inheritance

  • Manage content type behaviors.

    • This objective may include but is not limited to: manage event receivers, manage workflow associations, manage policies, manage document templates

  • Implement site provisioning.

    • This objective may include but is not limited to: create site definitions, create web templates, implement feature stapling, implement custom provisioning code

Implement Authorization and Authentication (10-15 percent)

  • Implement user authentication.

    • This objective may include but is not limited to: create a custom claims provider, create a custom sign-in page, create a custom membership provider, package and deploy a custom claims provider, package and deploy a custom membership provider, authenticate a user from a client application

  • Implement application authentication and authorization.

    • This objective may include but is not limited to: use the SharePoint App TokenHelper class, specify the App permission request scope manifest and permission request manifest, specify permissions for Office Store Apps, specify permissions for Corporate Catalog Apps, specify permissions for remote apps to access SharePoint data

  • Plan and implement user authorization.

    • This objective may include but is not limited to: create custom role definitions, create custom permission levels, maintain permissions, implement impersonation, plan and implement anonymous access, create a custom role manager

Access and Manage Data (10-15 percent)

  • Design solutions to handle large amounts of data.

    • This objective may include but is not limited to: create efficient CAML queries and views, choose appropriate APIs, create and use indexed columns, use Object Model Overrides, use Content Iterator, implement cross-site queries

  • Access data contained in SharePoint.

    • This objective may include but is not limited to: access data using server-side object model, access data using client-side object model (CSOM), access data using REST API, access data using out-of-the-box Web Services, access data using a custom WCF (Windows Communication Foundation) service to facilitate integration with an existing application

  • Store configuration data.

    • This objective may include but is not limited to: implement a hierarchical data store, implement a property bag, implement web.config, implement SharePoint List, implement credential storage

Implement SharePoint Solutions (15-20 percent)

  • Manage SharePoint Object Life Cycle.

    • This objective may include but is not limited to: implement Object Life Cycle management for SPWeb, implement Object Life Cycle management for SPSite, implement Object Life Cycle management for other objects, implement Object Life Cycle management with Windows PowerShell, implement Object Life Cycle management for SPContext

  • Upgrade solutions and features.

    • This objective may include but is not limited to: implement versioning of features and solutions, upgrade features and solutions, implement assembly versioning, build components for in-process request routing

  • Determine a solution structure.

    • This objective may include but is not limited to: select feature scope and visibility, define feature dependencies, define solution dependencies, organize SharePoint project items, structure app packages

  • Create sandbox solutions.

    • This objective may include but is not limited to: scope features to constraints, identify SharePoint artifacts that can be used in sandbox, access data outside of Sandbox scope, configure and troubleshoot sandbox solution deployment, upgrade sandbox solutions, implement solutions validators

  • Create a no-code solution.

    • This objective may include but is not limited to: configure no-code customizations for the SharePoint 2013 platform, create XSLT for web parts, create and upload JavaScript files, create Display Templates

Implement the User Experience and Information Architecture (10-15 percent)

  • Implement branding.

    • This objective may include but is not limited to: incorporate designer outputs, use Design Manager functionality, apply custom themes, export the design, create Master Page, create a channel

  • Implement navigation.

    • This objective may include but is not limited to: create a custom navigation provider, create taxonomy-based navigation, create search-driven navigation, configure globalcurrent navigation

  • Customize UI elements.

    • This objective may include but is not limited to: customize the ribbon, customize the edit control block (ECB), customize the status bar and notifications, customize the modal dialog window, customize the upgrade notification, select areas for Focus on Content

Create Business Processes (10-15 percent)

  • Create event receivers and timer jobs.

    • This objective may include but is not limited to: plan the use of event receivers or timer jobs, create remote event receivers, create a work item timer job

  • Create SharePoint Designer workflows.

    • This objective may include but is not limited to: plan the type of workflow and associated forms (site, reusable, list, InfoPath), use custom actions, create workflow definition, create reusable workflows for content types, import and export Microsoft Visio workflows, export a workflow to a SharePoint solution

  • Create and deploy Microsoft Visual Studio workflows.

    • This objective may include but is not limited to: create custom actions, create a workflow definition, create external connectors, deploy a workflow as part of a SharePoint solution or app, upgrade a SharePoint 2013 Visual Studio workflow, plan the type of workflow and associated forms

Create Office Apps (10-15 percent)

  • Plan and design applications.

    • This objective may include but is not limited to: choose a hosting location, specify a starting location, specify a licensing model, specify permission requirements, select a user experience for apps

  • Create applications.

    • This objective may include but is not limited to: create provider-hosted applications, create auto-hosted applications, create SharePoint-hosted applications, apply chrome control

  • Package and deploy Apps.

    • This objective may include but is not limited to: package an application, publish to Corporate Catalog, publish to SharePoint store, publish to Windows Azure, manage trust relationship with other providers

  • Manage the App life cycle.

    • This objective may include but is not limited to: upgrade an application, remove an application, manage licensing, manage usage tracking
Beta Started?
Only for fun, I took a look on the Prometric Website and saw that the 71-488 and 71-489 exams are there already. That would confirm the time frame I posted in February. 
SharePoint 2013 MCSD Beta exams. They got the name of 70-489 Wrong. 

Other good news is that everyone seems to be able to the those exams at your local Prometric Test Center.

I didn’t enter my Credit Card and scheduled it see what happens, however I think it would pass. If you go pass the beta, come back and tell us how it was in the comments. (Tell us what you can without violating your NDA of course).

Guess the official SharePoint 2013 MCSD announcement should come soon! Also, don’t forget to check my last post, which is a review of DocRead by Collaboris

Leave  a comment and don’t forget to like us on Facebook here and to follow me on Google+ here and on Twitter here  for the latest news and technical articles on SharePoint.  Also, don’t forget to check the SharePoint Community Partners list for other great SharePoint Sites, and vote for my blog if you like my content!

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Some News and DocRead by Collaboris Review

Categories: Other
Comments: No

You might be wondering why I haven’t posted much technical stuff lately, truth is I have been busy with work and my other Community site. As many of you know I co-founded the SharePoint-Community.Net with a few other SharePoint people. One of the fellow founders who I have got to know very well is Mark Jones. When Mark isn’t spending many an hour embedded helping me with the community he is working on his other passion – DocRead for SharePoint. As both a thank you and also because I am an inquisitive guy I asked him for a download of DocRead so that I could road test it and write a review. So here we go.

What is it ?

DocRead allows you to assign documents (stored in SharePoint document libraries) to groups of users. Once sent out you can then monitor who has and hasn’t read them via a set of reports which are all accessible from SharePoint pages. Collaboris market it as a system to help distribute company policies, procedures, employee handbooks and so on, but really, this could be used for anything. Project documents, User Guides, Financial Results, Company Newsletters, etc. In fact, if you have a document that needs to be signed-off or even one that’s a ‘recommended’ read then using DocRead makes this a very simple task.
So, here goes this is what it’s like to use right from the install to an end-user using it.

Installation

DocRead installs via a standard windows installer, which as far as I can see is responsible for deploying a few local files and 3 Farm Solutions (WSPs) into SharePoint :

The installer takes a minutes or two to run, and also recycles your app pools, so do this out of hours. It’s a pretty smooth experience though and once it’s complete you end up with these WSPs in your Farm :

Configuration

Now the WSPS are installed into SharePoint, next up is to configure it. After installation the new menu in Central Admin looks like this :

SQL Databases

What’s really interesting is that when you first configure DocRead you need to go into the ‘Database Settings’ screen and give it the name of 2 Databases which get created on the SQL server hosing the SharePoint Farm. As follows :
When I asked why this is the case, mark pointed me to their ‘DocRead Architecture’ document : http://spvlad.com/Z5BL6x  Within that there’s a section on ‘DocRead Data’ which states the following :

Roles

DocRead uses a top-down approach to when it comes to configuring. (e.g. the Farm Admin does some configuring, then hands over to the site collection admin who then hands over to the Site owner and so on..).
The following roles are required carry out the following tasks :

Farm Admin

·        Decides which web applications DocRead will installed upon on (e.g. Intranet, MySites, Collaboration, Projects, etc)
·        The frequency of the timer jobs (DocRead has 3 to do various processing like finding differences in audiences and groups and tasks processing)
·        And where to install Reporting. I looked into this and DocRead uses Telerik for their reports, which is deployed as a web app feature. This is optional, but I think reporting is the best part of the product.
·        Configuring messages (such as Ts and Cs)
·        Viewing logs – all the error and informational messages get put into the DocRead database.
·        Licensing – you can view full details of the license key, plus insert a new key as required.

Site Collection Admin

Now that DocRead has been deployed to the parent Web Application, it’s up to the Site Collection Admin to do one thing 
Activate the DocRead site collection feature – that’s it,

Site owner

Once the business have decided (and I stress business as they will be the ones to use DocRead), which sites they want to use DocRead on, it’s upto a person with “Full Control” permissions (usually the site owner) to activate DocRead on that site.


Once they do this they are then able to do the following :
Attach DocRead to one or more document libraries it the site
·        Configure other settings such as whether to “Force View” document
·      Configure a group who will be “DocRead Administrators” (can manage, view tasks and process)
·        Configure a group who will be “DocRead Publishers” (can send out documents out to groups of users with DocRead)
·        Add the DocRead Web parts to pages in SharePoint. These will probably be high hit pages (like home pages) so that you users are alerted as soon as they goto them.

DocRead Administrator

When playing with DocRead as someone in the group as specified as DocRead Administrator, I was able to :
·        View Reports (to see the status of the tasks in that site)
·        View Site Reading Tasks (also delete them)
·        Process Reading Tasks (this allows you to create tasks that have recently been assigned by a publisher)

DocRead Publisher

·        The person in this group can assign a document to a group (via edit properties).

Sending out a document to a group of users

This is very straight forward – all you need to is go to the ‘DocRead site Settings’ screen and ensure you doc library is added into the list. Then, when this is done find the document you want to send and pick some groups or audiences. You also need to specify how long you want users to read the document before it’s overdue. At this point, things turn red in the web part and overdue emails will be sent out.


One gotcha here is that you need to be a member of the SharePoint group that you set up as ‘DocRead publisher’. If not these columns can’t be set. So for example, if I am not in the ‘Approvers’ group I can’t send a document out with DocRead.


Emails

This confused me at first, but then if I only had read all the documentation! Email isn’t sent out using SharePoint which answered some of my initial confusion. Emails are actually sent by a windows service and that is configured by a Windows Application. I wasn’t quite sure why they built it in this manner so I emailed Mark to ask and he replied :
We have built it this way for two core reasons :
1.      Performance. DocRead is installed in some very large organizations who have a large number of documents and large number of users. To send out 1000’s of emails (on a daily basis) isn’t something you want your SharePoint servers to necessarily be doing.
2.      Licensing. We didn’t want the customer to be forced to purchase another SharePoint server license, so we made it work completely independently from SharePoint on normal Windows kit. Having said, that if you want to run the service on a SharePoint server, this is also completed supported. (a lot of customers choose to do this).

SmartMove

If you look on the DocRead web site you will  see ‘SmartMove’ being mentioned quite a lot. Mark was also very insistent I check it out! So what is it ? It turns out that SmartMove is VERY cool! It is the bit of tech that allows you to do this …
1.      Assign a ‘Required Audience’ called ‘Health and Safety Users’ to a document called ‘Health and Safety Guidelines.doc’ and give them 36 days to read and confirm.
2.      Let DocRead create new reading tasks for everyone in the ‘Health and Safety Users’ group.
3.      Some users confirm.
4.      6 months later a new starter joins the company and gets put into the ‘Health and Safety Users’ group.
5.      DocRead realises there is a new user who has not been asked to the read the  ‘Health and Safety Guidelines.doc’,  so it creates them a new reading task and gives them 36 days to read and confirm.
Imagine, just how cool that is ? Once you have configured your documents to groups or audiences, DocRead will monitor the group or audience for new entrants and ensure they are kept in line with company policy. This feature alone sells it for me!
I also tested to see what happens if you remove a user from the group…If this happens the user isn’t any longer required to read that document (and a negative receipt is created).

Reporting

One major part of this puzzle is around reporting. Once a publisher has sent out tasks to their employees they really need to be able chase and track who has read what. I imagine this would be especially important for documents that go to all employees in large orgs. DocRead ships with reports all pre-configured via one of the menu items in ‘Site Settings’. Once you click Report you are taken through to a page that allows you to view reports. As you would expect, the reports can be printed, exported and filtered and so on.
One nice feature would be to be able to create new ones, but there isn’t a way. However, I also asked Mark and he informed me that they can create custom reports if needed or a customer can hit some of the views in SQL to dev their own in something like SQL Reporting services.

Receipts

I noticed that when a user confirms a document, a new icon appears on the popup saying ‘View Receipt’.
This receipt shows that a user confirmed reading a version of a document at a certain time (think of it similar to an outlook receipt). Receipts are also accessible from a report by DocRead Admins. There is also the concept of a “negative receipt”, which will get created if a user doesn’t confirm a document. For example, if the document is deleted then they can’t read it any more. Not sure of the reason for negative receipts, but I guess there’s some auditing requirement that it meets..

Web Parts

There are several web parts that ship with DocRead which are split into two categories, tasks and charts. The tasks web parts show various views of the current site tasks, such as all tasks for the entire site, or a web part that shows all of a user’s tasks across the entire farm. The latter seemed the most appealing to me as this means you could put the web part on a user’s MySite and then allow them to see any tasks that had been allocated across all sites and site collections in the entire farm. Querying and showing content across site collections boundaries is usually a real pain, so this is a nice feature! Doesn’t matter where you have send the tasks from as the user can see them all in one bucket…
You would also more than likely place this web part on your Intranet home page so that users can immediately see they have some tasks to do.. Here’s what it looks like :
The other set of web parts are the charting web parts which give a visual way to see the break down and status of all the tasks in that site. These would be good on home page of the site in particular so that the publisher can see what’s happening.

Some fun scenarios

Being the admin I am – I decided to try some tricky stuff out to see if DocRead threw a wobbly and it held up really well. For example, if you assign 5 groups to a document to read and one person is in 4 of those groups, this still works fine. The user only sees 1 task but 4 are created behind the scenes. When they confirm – all the docs are confirmed. I also tried assigning 5 documents in different libraries, created the tasks and then deleted the libraries containing the documents (evil I know). At first the tasks remained then I noticed they got deleted. After more investigation, I noticed negative receipts were created. I asked Mark how and he mentioned that a Central Admin job synchronises what’s in SharePoint with what’s in DocRead. The other cool thing, if you restore the libraries then run a feature at the site level, back they come!
DocRead for the end-user
The last piece to cover is probably the most important. How does DocRead look to the end-user. The end-user will see and interact with DocRead by the following means :
·        WebPart placed on a page in SharePoint
·        Via one of the emails sent out to the user.
·        When navigating to the document library containing documents that are configured with DocRead – there’s a new menu on the Ribbon.

Regardless of the ways to see the tasks, you will always finally end up with a ‘popup reading window’ which gives the user the ability to read about the document, see information about the task and more importantly be able to confirm the document. To be honest it doesn’t really require too much explanation – it’s pretty straight forward and looks like this. Once they click the ‘view document’ the button is enabled.

Summary

Overall, I have got to say I mightily impressed and I think it’s an awesome solution to have in your SharePoint toolkit. From an Admins point of view I really like that they have thought about performance and security as the last thing you would want is this tool on all libraries in use by everyone. I am also glad Mark pointed me in the direction of Smart Move as this really is ‘smart’. It’s outstanding to think that you could send a document to ‘all staff’ and then as users join or move around, DocRead  will always keep them up to date. That is a huge time saver. If you have any more questions check out the Collaboris site  or email Mark himself!

That’s it for now, and don’t worry, I have some really cool and useful SharePoint articles coming up!

Leave  a comment and don’t forget to like us on Facebook here and to follow me on Google+ here and on Twitter here  for the latest news and technical articles on SharePoint.  Also, don’t forget to check the SharePoint Community Partners list for other great SharePoint Sites, and vote for my blog if you like my content!

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A while ago I posted the Three New Facts on the SharePoint 2013 MCSD Certification! – A Name, Exam Numbers and a Date! which confirmed the exams required for SharePoint 2013 MCSD were 480, 486, 488, 489.  At the time of that post, there were absolutely no details about the two SharePoint Exams.

However, last week Microsoft finally published details of one of the exams, 70-489 . Thanks a lot to Fan Zhang for telling me the details are up!

Official Exam Name

70-489 Developing Microsoft SharePoint Server 2013 Advanced Solutions

Date Exam will(should) be available

June 20, 2013

Technology 

This is really interesting. On the Site, the exam is supposed to be for Visual Studio 2010. I was really expecting it to be with Visual Studio 2012.

Audience Profile

Candidates for this exam typically are technical leads with at least four years of SharePoint and web development experience. The candidates are responsible for designing custom code for projects that are deployed to or interact with SharePoint environments.

The minimally qualified candidate typically has experience:

  • selecting an appropriate approach and building customizations in SharePoint.

  • planning and implementing solution packaging, deployment, and upgrading.

  • identifying SharePoint data and content structures for customizations.

  • performing diagnostics and debugging.

  • planning and designing applications for scalability and performance.

  • identifying and mitigating performance issues of customizations.

  • understanding authentication and authorization.

  • working with Windows PowerShell.  
The typical candidate usually also has familiarity with SharePoint capabilities and with Online Services such as Windows Azure and SharePoint Online.

Skills Measured

Design and Implement Search (15-20 percent)

  • Query Search.

    • This objective may include but is not limited to: build search queries using FQL (FAST Query Language) and KQL (Keyword Query Language), execute search queries using client-side object model (CSOM), Web Services, and REST

  • Customize search results.

    • This objective may include but is not limited to: create custom result sources, create display templates, create result types, create custom refiner definitions, implement query rules

  • Customize content processing.

    • This objective may include but is not limited to: feed external content types, implement content processing extensions (entity extraction), configure out-of-the box content processing, create content mappings

Implement  BCS (Business Connectivity Services) (10-15 percent)

  • Create a model.

    • This objective may include but is not limited to: optimize queries for performance and throttling, use naming conventions, use batching, create filters, implement methods, create associations

  • Create external content types.

    • This objective may include but is not limited to: use SQL data sources, use WCF (Windows Communication Foundation) Web Services, use oData, use.NET connector

  • Implement authorization and authentication.

    • This objective may include but is not limited to: use pass-through, use BCS Identity and User Identity, use a custom model

  • Create custom connectors.

    • This objective may include but is not limited to: implement methods (including Search), implement security trimming, implement configuration properties, implement caching, implement external event receiver

  • Access BCS data.

    • This objective may include but is not limited to: use BCS Web Parts, use BCS data in workflows, use BCS CSOM, use the server-side object model, use BCS REST

  • Implement client-side BCS.

    • This objective may include but is not limited to: use caching, use Microsoft Office apps, use Microsoft Visual Studio Tools for Office, use SQL replication, implement authorization and authentication

Implement User Profiles and Customize Social Workload (15-20 percent)

  • Manage user profile properties.

    • This objective may include but is not limited to: create and update user profile properties, update privacy filters, map properties to external data, use managed metadata term sets, update profile picture

  • Manage feeds.

    • This objective may include but is not limited to: use CSOM to follow documents, people, sites, get feeds, create posts, and manage Like, reply, mention, tag, link, add pictures

  • Access user profile data.

    • This objective may include but is not limited to: use CSOM, use the object model, use REST, use Web Services

Implement ECM (Enterprise Content Management) and WCM (Web Content Management) (15-20 percent)

  • Implement a multi-lingual site.

    • This objective may include but is not limited to: submit a page or batch of pages for translation, publish pages, create source and target labels, create channels, implement multi-language site navigation

  • Implement E-discovery.

    • This objective may include but is not limited to: create a new hold, integrate with Microsoft Exchange Web Services, specify content sources and Search criteria, export discovery sets, manage permissions for hold

  • Implement SEO (Search Engine Optimization).

    • This objective may include but is not limited to: create a site map, customize a site map, maintain SEO configuration properties, maintain robots.txt file, maintain SEO properties on term

  • Implement content management.

    • This objective may include but is not limited to: create information management policies, create content organizer rules, create document sets, create document ID providers

  • Implement a publishing page.

    • This objective may include but is not limited to: add field controls to a page layout, add web parts to a page layout, create a publishing page layout, inherit content types

Design for Performance and Troubleshooting (15-20 percent)

  • Design solutions to handle a high-traffic site.

    • This objective may include but is not limited to: combine images, implement caching, minimize number of queries, optimize JavaScript loading, use CDNs (Content Delivery Networks), create a scalable aggregator

  • Design client applications for performance.

    • This objective may include but is not limited to: leverage health score rules, optimize number of batch server requests, use client-side cache, minimize amount of data requested

  • Monitor and mitigate performance and scalability issues.

    • This objective may include but is not limited to: diagnose application stability issues, debug the server side and app code on the client side, create application diagnostics, measure and test application performance

Implement Managed Metadata Service (MMS) (15-20 percent)

  • Manage term sets.

    • This objective may include but is not limited to: import and export term sets, create multi-lingual labels, re-use terms, manage term properties, perform translation, create groups and assign permissions

  • Create solutions by using MMS.

    • This objective may include but is not limited to: use Profile Pages, use the Product Catalog, use cross-site publishing, integrate with Search, implement metadata-driven navigation

  • Use an MMS API.

    • This objective may include but is not limited to: use CSOM in client applications, use REST in client applications, use managed fields, use server-side object model

Also, there is another thing worth noting. The official MCSD SharePoint title will be : Microsoft Certified Solutions Developer (MCSD): SharePoint Applications. 

The link to go the official exam page is here: http://www.microsoft.com/learning/en/us/exam.aspx?id=70-489#fbid=XKt1nHNGE6F

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